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WoW, Benchmark

World of Warcraft CPU and GPU benchmarks

For three years now, Blizzard continues to develop WoW. Current versions promise the first dual-core support and an ingame benchmark. PCGH makes the performance test with Radeon, Geforce and Chrome.
World of Warcraft
 
World of Warcraft [Source: view picture gallery]
World of Warcraft had always a decisive advantage: It runs on almost every hardware and is very performant. With low details, even Voodoo 3, Riva TNT and Rage 128 achieve more or less playable framerates on the screen. Blizzard wants to improve this even more and mentions for the first time explicit optimizations on more than one CPU core. PCGH makes the test.
The task manager WoW uses both cores
 
The task manager WoW uses both cores [Source: view picture gallery]


We test the ability of the engine to use two CPU cores. Our testbed consists of a Core 2 Duo (Allendale, 2 MiByte L2 cache) on a P965 mobo in combination with a Geforce 8800 Ultra. The latter ensures that no graphics limitation prevails. In addition, we test the performance of a Radeon HD3870, a Chrome S25, S27 and two in multichrome mode.

New: The internal benchmark
World of Warcraft multicore testing: up to 35 percent more fps
 
World of Warcraft multicore testing: up to 35 percent more fps [Source: view picture gallery]
Fraps is no longer needed with benchmarks of WoW. Since the last patch, the game has an internal bench function, which can be activated with "/ timetest" in the chat window. Immediately after entering, a frame counter appears. The real test starts only if the player is heading for a griffin master and is daring a flight. Hardly in the air, the weather is turned off, the time of day is set to noon and all the players are hidden. This ensures that dynamic game delivers reproducible conditions - essential for meaningful benchmarks. After landing the game lists average, maximum and minimum fps. Our test flight is the way out of Ironforge, out on the snow-covered mountains, to Loch Modan.

Summary
World of Warcraft in 1.680x1.050 without FSAA/AF
 
World of Warcraft in 1.680x1.050 without FSAA/AF [Source: view picture gallery]
With 2.3 gigahertz, the second core provides for up to 35 percent more performance in comparison with the simulated single core CPU. Overclocked to 3.4 GHz , the difference between one and two cores shrinks to around 20 percent. The task manager (see pictures) confirmed that both cores are at least utilized by 50 percent. A dual-core at 2.5 GHz is almost as fast as an 3.4 GHz single core. In instances with lots of opponents and players, the gain by a further core is probably even higher.

The graphics card test in 1.680x1.050 pixels revealed that the Geforce 8 again profits from the high fillrate. Since WoW hardly uses pixel shading, the texel fillrate is of fundamental importance. The Chromes is far behind the other competitots, but multichrome shows a substantial scaling of nearly 50 percent.

World of Warcraft in 1.680x1.050 with 4x TSSAA/AAA and 16:1 AF
 
World of Warcraft in 1.680x1.050 with 4x TSSAA/AAA and 16:1 AF [Source: view picture gallery]

World of Warcraft
 
World of Warcraft [Source: view picture gallery]


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Author: Raffael Vötter (Feb 06, 2008)






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